Fluxes
Arthur Lipsett, Canada, 1968, 24 min



This experimental short conveys avant-garde filmmaker ARTHUR LIPSETT’s view of the human condition and the chaotic planet on which we live. As in his other films (Very Nice, Very Nice; 21-87), the flow of images in Fluxes seems somewhat disjointed and erratic – yet it all builds up to a devastating indictment of the modern world. The film’s only commentary consists of unrelated snatches of words and sounds.


***


N-Zone (1970) by ARTHUR LIPSETT (May 11, 2016)
The Arthur Lipsett Project: A Dot on the Histomap (2007) by ERIC GAUCHER (March 15, 2012)
Images tirées du film N-Zone (1970) d’ARTHUR LIPSETT (July 9, 2011)
Remembering Arthur (2006) by MARTIN LAVUT (May 12, 2011)
A Trip Down Memory Lane (1965) &
Very Nice, Very Nice (1961) by ARTHUR LIPSETT (May 12, 2011)
21-87 (1964) by ARTHUR LIPSETT (January 31, 2011)
Free Fall (1964) d’ARTHUR LIPSETT (April 28, 2010)

Présentement à l’affiche à la Cinémathèque (Montréal, p.Q.) :



Deprogrammed
Mia Donovan, Canada, 2015, 86 min



Deprogrammed chronicles Ted ‘Black Lightning’ Patrick’s anti-cult crusade. His practice of ‘deprogramming’, also known as ‘reverse brainwashing’, started in the early 1970s and quickly snowballed into a vast underground movement composed of concerned parents, ex-cultist-turned-deprogrammers and some sympathetic law-enforcers whose mission was to physically and mentally remove individuals from ‘cults’.


My stepbrother Matthew’s love of heavy-metal-music, juvenile delinquent tendencies and fixation on the Satanic Bible led his father to hire Patrick to deprogram Matthew while confining him to a motel room for 8-days. In 2011, after 18-years of estrangement, I sought Matthew out and discovered that the deprogramming that he endured did more harm than good. This led me to a deeper inquiry into Ted Patrick’s pioneering technique, resulting in a 2-year journey to track down others who’d been deprogrammed. Through interviews and the never-before-seen archives of the actual deprogrammings of those individuals, the film will begin to unravel what it might mean to be in a high-control group under a form of ‘thought-control’, the line where free will begins to blur.


Along with extensive interviews with the now 84-year-old Father of deprogramming himself as he reflects on his career, news archives will also reveal the changing attitude that the public and law enforcement agencies developed towards Ted Patrick’s controversial approach to deprogramming. Looking back at the involuntary deprogramming era (1971 until around 1990) this documentary questions how much the practice was a result of moral panic and how much of it was in fact a matter of cultic mind-control?



Deprogrammed (2015) a film by MIA DONOVAN

eyesteelfilm.com/deprogrammed


***


Marjoe (1972) by HOWARD SMITH & SARAH KERNOCHAN (October 24, 2012)
Deliver Us From Evil (2006) by AMY J. BERG (October 23, 2012)
Jesus Camp (2006) de HEIDI EWING & RACHEL GRADY (September 20, 2011)


N-Zone
Arthur Lipsett, Canada, 1970, 45 min



ARTHUR LIPSETT pieces together his visions of this fragmented world from odds and ends, even leftovers, from other people’s photography and sound recording. By juxtaposing his snippets of “found film” with snatches of comment or dialogue echoing the banality of human communication, LIPSETT shows the emptiness of much of what we say or do. N-Zone is one man’s surrealist sampler of the human condition.



N-Zone (1970) by ARTHUR LIPSETT

N-Zone (1970) by ARTHUR LIPSETT

N-Zone (1970) by ARTHUR LIPSETT

N-Zone (1970) by ARTHUR LIPSETT

N-Zone (1970) by ARTHUR LIPSETT


***


The Arthur Lipsett Project: A Dot on the Histomap (2007) by ERIC GAUCHER (March 15, 2012)
Images tirées du film N-Zone (1970) d’ARTHUR LIPSETT (July 9, 2011)
Remembering Arthur (2006) by MARTIN LAVUT (May 12, 2011)
A Trip Down Memory Lane (1965) &
Very Nice, Very Nice (1961) by ARTHUR LIPSETT (May 12, 2011)
21-87 (1964) by ARTHUR LIPSETT (January 31, 2011)
Free Fall (1964) d’ARTHUR LIPSETT (April 28, 2010)


Turning The Art World Inside Out
Jack Cocke, UK, 2013, 69 min



Alan Yentob travels the world to discover why so-called “Outsider Art” has gone from being one of the most overlooked art-forms of the late 20th century, to one of the most essential of the 21st century.


In this episode from the acclaimed BBC documentary strand “Imagine”, Yentob travels from Japan’s Miho Mountains to Creative Growth in California, encountering self-taught artists like Shinichi Sawada, Ionel Talzapan, George Widener and William Scott, alongside Joe Coleman, Heinrich Reisenbauer, Dan Miller and Paul Laffoley.


There are contributions from some of the genre’s many activists and admirers, including Johann Feilacher (Gugging, Vienna), James Brett (The Museum of Everything, London), curators Massimiliano Gioni (New Museum, NY) and Ralph Rugoff (Hayward Gallery, London) and art critics Roberta Smith (New York Times) and Jerry Saltz (New York Magazine).


They are joined by gallerists Frank Maresca (Ricco Maresca, NY) and Henry Boxer (Henry Boxer Gallery, London) and pioneers John Maizels (Raw Vision, London) and Rebecca Hoffberger (American Visionary Art Museum, Baltimore), who together try to assess the challenges posed by an alternative art historical narrative.



JOE COLEMAN

PAUL LAFFOLEY

IONEL TALPAZAN

***


Bozarts (1969) de JACQUES GIRALDEAU (June 20, 2013)
R.I.P., Rest in Pieces: A Portrait of Joe Coleman (1997) by ROBERT-ADRIAN PEJO
(December 26, 2011)
MARCEL BARIL: figure énigmatique de l’art québécois (2002) (November 23, 2011)


Black Narcissus
Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger, UK, 1947, 100 min



‘After opening a convent in the Himalayas, five nuns encounter conflict and tension – both with the natives and also within their own group – as they attempt to adapt to their remote, exotic surroundings.’



Black Narcissus (1947) by MICHAEL POWELL and EMERIC PRESSBURGER

Black Narcissus (1947) by MICHAEL POWELL and EMERIC PRESSBURGER

Black Narcissus (1947) by MICHAEL POWELL and EMERIC PRESSBURGER

Black Narcissus (1947) by MICHAEL POWELL and EMERIC PRESSBURGER

Black Narcissus (1947) by MICHAEL POWELL and EMERIC PRESSBURGER

Liturgie Apocryphe

"The production of nervous force is directly connected with the diet of an individual, and its refining depends on the very purity of this diet, allied to appropriate breathing exercises.

The diet most calculated to act effectively on the nervous force is that which contains the least quantity of animal matter; therefore the Pythagorean diet, in this connection, is the most suitable.

...

The main object was to avoid introducing into the organism what Descartes called 'animal spirits'. Thus, all animals that had to serve for the nourishment of the priests were slaughtered according to special rites, they were not murdered, as is the case nowadays".