L'Abbatiale de la
Liturgie Apocryphe

Montréal, p.Q.

 

***

 

At age sixteen I began what would be a four year struggle with bulimia. When the symptoms started, I turned in desperation to adults who knew more than I did about how to stop shameful behavior—my Bible study leader and a visiting youth minister. “If you ask anything in faith, believing,” they said. “It will be done.” I knew they were quoting the Word of God. We prayed together, and I went home confident that God had heard my prayers.

 

But my horrible compulsions didn’t go away. By the fall of my sophomore year in college, I was desperate and depressed enough that I made a suicide attempt. The problem wasn’t just the bulimia. I was convinced by then that I was a complete spiritual failure. My college counseling department had offered to get me real help (which they later did). But to my mind, at that point, such help couldn’t fix the core problem: I was a failure in the eyes of God. It would be years before I understood that my inability to heal bulimia through the mechanisms offered by biblical Christianity was not a function of my own spiritual deficiency but deficiencies in Evangelical religion itself.

 

Dr. Marlene Winell is a human development consultant in the San Francisco Area. She is also the daughter of Pentecostal missionaries. This combination has given her work an unusual focus. For the past twenty years she has counseled men and women in recovery from various forms of fundamentalist religion including the Assemblies of God denomination in which she was raised. Winell is the author of Leaving the Fold – A Guide for Former Fundamentalists and Others Leaving their Religion, written during her years of private practice in psychology. Over the years, Winell has provided assistance to clients whose religious experiences were even more damaging than mine. Some of them are people whose psychological symptoms weren’t just exacerbated by their religion, but actually caused by it.

 

Two years ago, Winell made waves by formally labeling what she calls “Religious Trauma Syndrome” (RTS) and beginning to write and speak on the subject for professional audiences. When the British Association of Behavioral and Cognitive Psychologists published a series of articles on the topic, members of a Christian counseling association protested what they called excessive attention to a “relatively niche topic.” One commenter said, “A religion, faith or book cannot be abuse but the people interpreting can make anything abusive.”

 

Is toxic religion simply misinterpretation? What is religious trauma? Why does Winell believe religious trauma merits its own diagnostic label? I asked her.

 

Let’s start this interview with the basics. What exactly is religious trauma syndrome?

 

Winell: Religious trauma syndrome (RTS) is a set of symptoms and characteristics that tend to go together and which are related to harmful experiences with religion. They are the result of two things: immersion in a controlling religion and the secondary impact of leaving a religious group. The RTS label provides a name and description that affected people often recognize immediately. Many other people are surprised by the idea of RTS, because in our culture it is generally assumed that religion is benign or good for you. Just like telling kids about Santa Claus and letting them work out their beliefs later, people see no harm in teaching religion to children.

 

But in reality, religious teachings and practices sometimes cause serious mental health damage. The public is somewhat familiar with sexual and physical abuse in a religious context. As Journalist Janet Heimlich has documented in, Breaking Their Will, Bible-based religious groups that emphasize patriarchal authority in family structure and use harsh parenting methods can be destructive.

 

But the problem isn’t just physical and sexual abuse. Emotional and mental treatment in authoritarian religious groups also can be damaging because of

1) toxic teachings like eternal damnation or original sin

2) religious practices or mindset, such as punishment, black and white thinking, or sexual guilt, and

3) neglect that prevents a person from having the information or opportunities to develop normally.

 

Can you give me an example of RTS from your consulting practice?

 

Winell: I can give you many. One of the symptom clusters is around fear and anxiety. People indoctrinated into fundamentalist Christianity as small children sometimes have memories of being terrified by images of hell and apocalypse before their brains could begin to make sense of such ideas. Some survivors, who I prefer to call “reclaimers,” have flashbacks, panic attacks, or nightmares in adulthood even when they intellectually no longer believe the theology. One client of mine, who during the day functioned well as a professional, struggled with intense fear many nights. She said,

 

I was afraid I was going to hell. I was afraid I was doing something really wrong. I was completely out of control. I sometimes would wake up in the night and start screaming, thrashing my arms, trying to rid myself of what I was feeling. I’d walk around the house trying to think and calm myself down, in the middle of the night, trying to do some self-talk, but I felt like it was just something that – the fear and anxiety was taking over my life.

Or consider this comment, which refers to a film used by Evangelicals to warn about the horrors of the “end times” for nonbelievers.

 

I was taken to see the film “A Thief In The Night”. WOW. I am in shock to learn that many other people suffered the same traumas I lived with because of this film. A few days or weeks after the film viewing, I came into the house and mom wasn’t there. I stood there screaming in terror. When I stopped screaming, I began making my plan: Who my Christian neighbors were, who’s house to break into to get money and food. I was 12 yrs old and was preparing for Armageddon alone.

In addition to anxiety, RTS can include depression, cognitive difficulties, and problems with social functioning. In fundamentalist Christianity, the individual is considered depraved and in need of salvation. A core message is “You are bad and wrong and deserve to die.” (The wages of sin is death.) This gets taught to millions of children through organizations like Child Evangelism Fellowship, and there is a group organized to oppose their incursion into public schools. I’ve had clients who remember being distraught when given a vivid bloody image of Jesus paying the ultimate price for their sins. Decades later they sit telling me that they can’t manage to find any self-worth.

 

After twenty-seven years of trying to live a perfect life, I failed. . . I was ashamed of myself all day long. My mind battling with itself with no relief. . . I always believed everything that I was taught but I thought that I was not approved by God. I thought that basically I, too, would die at Armageddon.
I’ve spent literally years injuring myself, cutting and burning my arms, taking overdoses and starving myself, to punish myself so that God doesn’t have to punish me. It’s taken me years to feel deserving of anything good.

Born-again Christianity and devout Catholicism tell people they are weak and dependent, calling on phrases like “lean not unto your own understanding” or “trust and obey.” People who internalize these messages can suffer from learned helplessness. I’ll give you an example from a client who had little decision-making ability after living his entire life devoted to following the “will of God.” The words here don’t convey the depth of his despair.

 

I have an awful time making decisions in general. Like I can’t, you know, wake up in the morning, “What am I going to do today? Like I don’t even know where to start. You know all the things I thought I might be doing are gone and I’m not sure I should even try to have a career; essentially I babysit my four-year-old all day.

Authoritarian religious groups are subcultures where conformity is required in order to belong. Thus if you dare to leave the religion, you risk losing your entire support system as well.

 

I lost all my friends. I lost my close ties to family. Now I’m losing my country. I’ve lost so much because of this malignant religion and I am angry and sad to my very core. . . I have tried hard to make new friends, but I have failed miserably. . . I am very lonely.

Leaving a religion, after total immersion, can cause a complete upheaval of a person’s construction of reality, including the self, other people, life, and the future. People unfamiliar with this situation, including therapists, have trouble appreciating the sheer terror it can create.

 

My form of religion was very strongly entrenched and anchored deeply in my heart. It is hard to describe how fully my religion informed, infused, and influenced my entire worldview. My first steps out of fundamentalism were profoundly frightening and I had frequent thoughts of suicide. Now I’m way past that but I still haven’t quite found “my place in the universe”.

Even for a person who was not so entrenched, leaving one’s religion can be a stressful and significant transition.

 

Many people seem to walk away from their religion easily, without really looking back. What is different about the clientele you work with?

 

Winell: Religious groups that are highly controlling, teach fear about the world, and keep members sheltered and ill-equipped to function in society are harder to leave easily. The difficulty seems to be greater if the person was born and raised in the religion rather than joining as an adult convert. This is because they have no frame of reference – no other “self” or way of “being in the world.” A common personality type is a person who is deeply emotional and thoughtful and who tends to throw themselves wholeheartedly into their endeavors. “True believers” who then lose their faith feel more anger and depression and grief than those who simply went to church on Sunday.

 

Aren’t these just people who would be depressed, anxious, or obsessive anyways?

 

Winell: Not at all. If my observation is correct, these are people who are intense and involved and caring. They hang on to the religion longer than those who simply “walk away” because they try to make it work even when they have doubts. Sometime this is out of fear, but often it is out of devotion. These are people for whom ethics, integrity and compassion matter a great deal. I find that when they get better and rebuild their lives, they are wonderfully creative and energetic about new things.

 

In your mind, how is RTS different from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder?

 

Winell: RTS is a specific set of symptoms and characteristics that are connected with harmful religious experience, not just any trauma. This is crucial to understanding the condition and any kind of self-help or treatment. (More details about this can be found on my Journey Free website and discussed in my talk at the Texas Freethought Convention.)

 

Another difference is the social context, which is extremely different from other traumas or forms of abuse. When someone is recovering from domestic abuse, for example, other people understand and support the need to leave and recover. They don’t question it as a matter of interpretation, and they don’t send the person back for more. But this is exactly what happens to many former believers who seek counseling. If a provider doesn’t understand the source of the symptoms, he or she may send a client for pastoral counseling, or to AA, or even to another church. One reclaimer expressed her frustration this way:

 

Include physically-abusive parents who quote “Spare the rod and spoil the child” as literally as you can imagine and you have one fucked-up soul: an unloved, rejected, traumatized toddler in the body of an adult. I’m simply a broken spirit in an empty shell. But wait…That’s not enough!? There’s also the expectation by everyone in society that we victims should celebrate this with our perpetrators every Christmas and Easter!!

Just like disorders such as autism or bulimia, giving RTS a real name has important advantages. People who are suffering find that having a label for their experience helps them feel less alone and guilty. Some have written to me to express their relief:

 

There’s actually a name for it! I was brainwashed from birth and wasted 25 years of my life serving Him! I’ve since been out of my religion for several years now, but I cannot shake the haunting fear of hell and feel absolutely doomed. I’m now socially inept, unemployable, and the only way I can have sex is to pay for it.

Labeling RTS encourages professionals to study it more carefully, develop treatments, and offer training. Hopefully, we can even work on prevention.

 

What do you see as the difference between religion that causes trauma and religion that doesn’t?

 

Winell: Religion causes trauma when it is highly controlling and prevents people from thinking for themselves and trusting their own feelings. Groups that demand obedience and conformity produce fear, not love and growth. With constant judgment of self and others, people become alienated from themselves, each other, and the world. Religion in its worst forms causes separation.

 

Conversely, groups that connect people and promote self-knowledge and personal growth can be said to be healthy. The book, Healthy Religion, describes these traits. Such groups put high value on respecting differences, and members feel empowered as individuals. They provide social support, a place for events and rites of passage, exchange of ideas, inspiration, opportunities for service, and connection to social causes. They encourage spiritual practices that promote health like meditation or principles for living like the golden rule. More and more, nontheists are asking how they can create similar spiritual communities without the supernaturalism. An atheist congregation in London launched this year and has received over 200 inquiries from people wanting to replicate their model.

 

Some people say that terms like “recovery from religion” and “religious trauma syndrome” are just atheist attempts to pathologize religious belief.

 

Winell: Mental health professionals have enough to do without going out looking for new pathology. I never set out looking for a “niche topic,” and certainly not religious trauma syndrome. I originally wrote a paper for a conference of the American Psychological Association and thought that would be the end of it. Since then, I have tried to move on to other things several times, but this work has simply grown.

 

In my opinion, we are simply, as a culture, becoming aware of religious trauma. More and more people are leaving religion, as seen by polls showing that the “religiously unaffiliated” have increased in the last five years from just over 15% to just under 20% of all U.S. adults. It’s no wonder the internet is exploding with websites for former believers from all religions, providing forums for people to support each other. The huge population of people “leaving the fold” includes a subset at risk for RTS, and more people are talking about it and seeking help. For example, there are thousands of former Mormons, and I was asked to speak about RTS at an Exmormon Foundation conference. I facilitate an international support group online called Release and Reclaim which has monthly conference calls. An organization called Recovery from Religion, helps people start self-help meet-up groups

 

Saying that someone is trying to pathologize authoritarian religion is like saying someone pathologized eating disorders by naming them. Before that, they were healthy? No, before that we weren’t noticing. People were suffering, thought they were alone, and blamed themselves. Professionals had no awareness or training. This is the situation of RTS today. Authoritarian religion is already pathological, and leaving a high-control group can be traumatic. People are already suffering. They need to be recognized and helped.




Valerie Tarico
AlterNet

 
 

***

 

“L’éducation chrétienne traditionnelle favorise les troubles névrotiques et les maladies psychosomatiques qui en sont la conséquence”

 

La névrose chrétienne (1976) par le Docteur PIERRE SOLIGNAC (May 25, 2012)

 

 

 

Voir cette publication sur Instagram

 

Une publication partagée par decolonizemyself (@decolonizemyself)

 
 

 

Voir cette publication sur Instagram

 

Une publication partagée par @wetsuweten_checkpoint

 

***

 

Dans le cadre de leur assemblée plénière, les évêques du Canada ont fait part de leurs excuses officielles aux peuples autochtones, dont de nombreux membres ont été victimes d’abus dans les pensionnats indiens du pays. Ils redisent leur engagement à poursuivre un processus de réconciliation. Les récentes découvertes de centaines tombes d’enfants des premières nations avait remis en lumière cette page douloureuse de l’histoire canadienne.

 

Dans sa déclaration publiée ce 24 septembre, l’épiscopat canadien exprime son «profond remords» et présente «des excuses sans équivoque» face à «la souffrance vécue dans les pensionnats indiens du Canada». Pendant des décennies, jusque dans les années 1990, les autorités canadiennes ont en effet mené une politique d’assimilation forcée, s’appuyant sur des établissements d’enseignement publics, les «écoles résidentielles» – dont certaines étaient gérées par l’Église catholique – où les enfants autochtones étaient privés de contact avec leurs familles et empêchés de parler leur langue maternelle.

 

De nombreuses communautés religieuses et des diocèses catholiques ont servi dans ce système qui a conduit à la suppression des langues, de la culture et de la spiritualité autochtones, sans respecter la richesse de l’histoire, des traditions et de la sagesse des peuples autochtones», reconnaissent à cet égard les évêques.

 

Un «traumatisme historique et continu»

La découverte de 215 tombes d’enfants des premières nations fin mai sur le site de l’ancien pensionnat de Kamloops, puis celle de 750 sépultures anonymes fin juin, dans un autre ancien pensionnat géré par l’Église catholique dans le Saskatchewan, avaient suscité une onde de choc dans le pays et rouvert les blessures d’un «génocide culturel», selon les termes d’une commission d’enquête canadienne.

 

Nous reconnaissons les graves abus qui ont été commis par certains membres de notre communauté catholique: physiques, psychologiques, émotionnels, spirituels, culturels et sexuels. Nous reconnaissons également avec tristesse le traumatisme historique et continu, de même que l’héritage de souffrances et de défis qui perdure encore aujourd’hui pour les peuples autochtones», écrivent les évêques dans leur déclaration.

 

Avancer sur un chemin «de guérison et de réconciliation»

Ils rappellent également être «pleinement engagés dans le processus de guérison et de réconciliation», notamment à travers des initiatives pastorales en cours dans plusieurs diocèses et une collecte de fonds.

 

Les évêques canadiens parlent ensuite de leurs engagements à venir pour cheminer avec les peuples autochtones «dans une nouvelle ère de réconciliation». Il s’agit de «prioriser les initiatives de guérison, écouter l’expérience des peuples autochtones, spécialement les survivants et survivantes des pensionnats indiens, et éduquer les membres de notre clergé, les hommes et femmes consacrés, de même que les fidèles laïcs, sur les cultures et la spiritualité autochtones. Nous nous engageons à poursuivre le travail visant à fournir les documents ou les archives qui aideront à commémorer les personnes qui sont enterrées dans des sépultures anonymes», expliquent-ils.

 
 

Rencontre avec le Saint-Père en décembre

L’épiscopat réaffirme qu’une délégation autochtone, «composée de survivants et survivantes, d’aînés, de gardiens et gardiennes du savoir, et de jeunes, rencontrera le Saint-Père à Rome en décembre 2021». Une rencontre déjà annoncée fin juin par la Conférence épiscopale canadienne. «Le pape François recevra et écoutera les participants et participantes autochtones, afin de discerner comment il peut appuyer notre désir commun de renouveler les relations et de marcher ensemble sur le chemin de l’espérance dans les années à venir. Nous nous engageons à travailler avec le Saint-Siège et nos partenaires autochtones sur la possibilité d’une visite pastorale du Pape au Canada dans le cadre de ce cheminement de guérison», annoncent aussi les évêques.

 

«Respectant votre résilience, votre force et votre sagesse, nous sommes impatients de vous écouter et d’apprendre de vous alors que nous marcherons en solidarité», concluent-ils en s’adressant aux Premières Nations, aux Métis et aux Inuits du Canada.

 
 

Vatican News

 

***

 

More churches burn down on Canada indigenous land (June 26, 2021)
Jusqu’à 751 tombes découvertes sur le site d’un ancien pensionnat autochtone de Saskatchewan (June 25, 2021)
Ancien pensionnat autochtone : Les restes de 215 enfants retrouvés en Colombie-Britannique (May 28, 2021)

Between early 2015 and January 2020, of all known institutions where abuse had taken place, 11% (443 instances) were committed within a religious organisation or setting. In one instance, a young boy was abused during Sunday school camps.

 

Child sexual abuse is prevalent in faith institutions across most major religions in the UK, with a report accusing these organisations of “blatant hypocrisy” and “moral failings”.

 

The Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA) found “shocking” failings across a number of organisations, and cases of abuse perpetrated by religious followers.

 

Between early 2015 and January 2020, of all known institutions where abuse had taken place, 11% (443 instances) were committed within a religious organisation or setting.

 

Ten percent of suspects (726 people) were employed by – or somehow linked to – a religious organisation or setting.

 

However, there is likely to be “significant” under-reporting, the IICSA said, adding: “There is no way of knowing the true scale of such abuse.”

 

In one instance, four children were sexually abused when they were approximately nine years old whilst being taught the Quran by a teacher in a mosque. In 2017, the perpetrator was convicted and sentenced to 13 years in jail.

 

Another 10-year-old girl was abused by a church volunteer, but when her mother disclosed this to the police, the church minister said the abuser was “valued” and must be considered “innocent until proven guilty”. It was later discovered the abuser had been dismissed from a police force following charges of unlawful sexual intercourse with a minor.

 

One young boy was abused by a Sunday school activity leader during religious camps shortly after his mother died. The seven-year-old was told not to tell anyone because “no one in the church would believe him”.

 

Professor Alexis Jay, chair of the inquiry, said:

 

“Religious organisations are defined by their moral purpose of teaching right from wrong and protection of the innocent and the vulnerable.

 

“However, when we heard about shocking failures to prevent and respond to child sexual abuse across almost all major religions, it became clear many are operating in direct conflict with this mission.

 

“Blaming the victims, fears of reputational damage and discouraging external reporting are some of the barriers victims and survivors face, as well as clear indicators of religious organisations prioritising their own reputations above all else. For many, these barriers have been too difficult to overcome.”

Barriers to reporting abuse included victim-blaming, an absence of discussions about sex and sexuality, the discouragement of external reporting, and prioritising the organisation’s reputation above the needs of victims.

 

The report recommended all religious organisations have a child protection policy and support procedures. It said the government should legislate to amend the definition of full-time education to bring any setting that is the pupil’s primary place of education within the scope of a registered school.

 

This would provide Ofsted with sufficient powers to examine the quality of child protection when undertaking an inspection of suspected unregistered schools.

 

Currently, an estimated quarter of a million children in England and Wales receive “supplementary schooling” from a faith organisation.

 

There is also no central list or register of faith-based organisations in England and Wales, despite the Charity Commission estimating that there are over 34,000 organisations.

 

Richard Scorer, specialist abuse lawyer at Slater & Gordon who acts for seven victim and survivor groups in the inquiry, including those representing Jewish, South Asian and Jehovahs Witnesses’ survivors, said: “Today’s report confirms that some religious groups have catastrophically failed to protect children in their care and that many have patchy or non-existent safeguarding policies and support for victims and survivors of abuse.

 

“This is simply unacceptable.

 

“It is clear from the report that too many religious organisations continue to prioritise the protection, reputation and authority of religious leaders above the rights of children.”

It comes as abuse victims told Sky News there was a culture within the Jehovah’s Witnesses that fails those looking for help and puts others at risk.

 

The IICSA examined evidence from 38 religious organisations with a presence in England and Wales – including Buddhism, Hinduism, Paganism, Christianity, and new religious movements, such as Scientology, among others.

 

It sought evidence from individuals that represented the majority of those with religious affiliations within England and Wales, of which 59% of the population identifies as Christian, 25% of no religion, 5% Muslim, 4% other – including Judaism, Sikhism, Hinduism, and Buddhism – and 7% not stated.




The report was based on 16 days of public hearings held during March, May and August last year.

 

The final report with findings from all 19 sections of the investigation, launched in 2014, will be laid before Parliament next summer.




Megan Baynes
Sky News

Un débat juridique se tiendra pour la première fois en Cour supérieure sur la responsabilité des commissions scolaires et du gouvernement du Québec relativement aux abus sexuels présumément commis par des représentants de l’Église catholique dans les écoles de la province. C’est ce qu’a tranché le juge Paul Mayer dans un jugement rendu lundi dans le cadre de l’action collective intentée contre les Frères de Sainte-Croix.

 

« Le juge nous dit que les prétentions que nous avions n’étaient pas des prétentions qui étaient non fondées, frivoles et dénuées de sens et qu’elles méritent un débat », a déclaré au Devoir Me Éric Simard, qui représente les Frères de Sainte-Croix.

 

Celui-ci s’est dit satisfait du jugement, qui permettra à l’ordre religieux de présenter ses arguments en cour voulant que plusieurs acteurs du système d’éducation québécois aient failli à leurs responsabilités de protéger les élèves de la province.

 

Pour ce faire, la congrégation de Sainte-Croix avait déposé en janvier dernier des actes d’intervention forcée pour appel en garantie à l’endroit de 130 fabriques, évêques et corporations religieuses, de 25 commissions scolaires et centres de services scolaires, de 11 compagnies d’assurance, ainsi que du procureur général du Québec.

 

Un acte d’intervention forcée pour appel en garantie est utilisé pour forcer un tiers à intervenir dans un litige et lui faire assumer une responsabilité totale ou partagée pour les fautes reprochées.

 

L’oratoire Saint-Joseph, qui est également visé par cette deuxième action collective contre les Frères de Sainte-Croix — la première a été réglée en 2011 —, avait aussi déposé des actes d’intervention forcée pour appel en garantie contre sept compagnies d’assurances.

 

« Ces procédures ajoutent donc 174 parties au dossier. Ainsi, 19 nouveaux cabinets d’avocats ont comparu pour les défenderesses en garantie », signale le juge Mayer dans son jugement.

 

 

« Recours titanesque »

La décision de lundi se penchait sur l’opposition du procureur général du Québec et des centres de services scolaires à ces actes d’intervention forcée, ainsi que sur l’opposition du demandeur de l’action collective [qui représente les victimes], identifié par les initiales J.J.. Celui-ci contestait ces procédures en les qualifiant d’abusives et de déraisonnables, avançant qu’elles avaient pour effet de créer un « recours titanesque ».

 

Ces arguments n’ont pas convaincu le juge Mayer, qui a rejeté ces demandes en rejet. « Les principes de solidarité juridique énoncés par les Sainte-Croix ne sont pas téméraires, frivoles ou dilatoires », souligne-t-il dans sa décision.

 

Le magistrat a toutefois accepté d’exclure de l’acte d’intervention forcée 14 centres de services scolaires pour lesquels les Frères de Sainte-Croix n’ont pu démontrer que leurs religieux y avaient œuvré.

 

 

Devoirs de vérification

Devant le juge Mayer, les Frères de Sainte-Croix ont fait valoir que les « centres de services scolaires / commissions scolaires et le procureur général du Québec ont grossièrement négligé leurs devoirs de visite, de vérification, d’inspection ou d’enquête dans les établissements dans lesquels ont œuvré des religieux de Sainte-Croix », rapporte le magistrat dans sa décision.

 

Selon lui, les conditions d’ouverture d’un appel en garantie sont remplies puisqu’il y a « présence d’une situation de solidarité légale ».

 

Le juge Mayer permet donc la tenue d’un débat qui sera tenu ultérieurement en cour sur la responsabilité du gouvernement du Québec et des commissions scolaires, « sans présumer de quelconque façon des chances de succès » des parties.

 

« Pour obtenir gain de cause contre le procureur général du Québec et les centres de services scolaires / commissions scolaires, les Sainte-Croix devront démontrer qu’ils ont négligé leurs obligations et leurs responsabilités. Ils devront également démontrer le lien causal avec les dommages allégués par J.J. pour le compte des membres », précise Paul Mayer.

 

 

Partage de responsabilité

En entrevue au Devoir, Me Éric Simard, qui représente les Frères de Sainte-Croix, assure que l’ordre religieux ne cherche d’aucune manière à se délester de toute responsabilité.

 

« Loin de nous l’idée d’exclure toute faute de la part des congrégations religieuses qui ont été impliquées dans cette mission éducative », dit-il.

 

« Pour le moment, il y a un débat quant au partage de responsabilités qui devra avoir lieu entre ces acteurs non religieux et les autres acteurs religieux », précise-t-il.

 

Me Alain Arsenault, qui représente les victimes présumées des Frères de Sainte-Croix, convient que le juge Mayer a rendu « un bon jugement en droit ». L’avocat espère toutefois que le recours principal sera disjoint des actions en garantie pour que les dossiers puissent suivre leur cours en parallèle.

 

« C’est trop gros sinon, avance-t-il. Le recours [dans sa forme actuelle] est démesuré. » Selon Me Arsenault, le juge Mayer devrait se pencher prochainement sur la question.

 

Élisabeth Gosselin, l’attachée de presse du ministre de la Justice et procureur général du Québec, Simon Jolin-Barrette, a écrit au Devoir que « le procureur général du Québec prend acte du jugement rendu [lundi] et procédera à son analyse ».

 

« Compte tenu des procédures judiciaires en cours, nous ne commenterons pas davantage », ajoute-t-elle.

 

Par ailleurs, des actes d’intervention forcée ont également été déposés à l’endroit du procureur général du Québec et de plusieurs commissions scolaires dans l’action collective intentée contre les Frères du Sacré-Cœur. Ceux-ci sont également représentés par Me Éric Simard.

 

Le 29 juin, une entente à l’amiable de 60 millions de dollars au bénéfice des victimes est survenue dans ce dossier. La congrégation a tout de même annoncé son intention de poursuivre les actions en garantie intentées à l’encontre du gouvernement du Québec et des centres de service scolaires.

 

 

Magdaline Boutros
Le Devoir

 
 

***

 

(…) À partir de quand peut-on dire que ça (les actions commises par l’Église Catholique) – telle organisation, qui s’est comportée de telle façon, qui a fait tant de victimes … À partir de quand dit-on que c’est une organisation criminelle? – Alain Crevier à l’émission de radio Midi Info de Radio-Canada, édition du 20 décembre 2018 (12 h 21 Des prêtres accusés d’actes pédophiles dans l’Illinois : Le regard d’Alain Crevier)

 

***

 

bishop-accountability.org : Documenting the Abuse Crisis in the Roman Catholic Church

 

***

 

  1. L’Église catholique de Pologne reconnaît avoir abusé de 368 enfants entre 2018 et 2020 (June 28, 2021)
  2. Le Vatican inscrit explicitement la pédocriminalité dans le droit de l’Église (June 1, 2021)
  3. Recours contre le diocèse de Trois-Rivières initié par Dominic Maurais: «Je porte en moi cette blessure»
    (March 26, 2021)
  4. Pédocriminalité en France : 10 000 victimes possibles de l’Église depuis 1950 (March 2, 2021)
  5. Abus sexuels du prêtre Brian Boucher : Un rapport accablant pour l’Église montréalaise (November 25, 2020)
  6. Suburban NY diocese files for bankruptcy amid abuse lawsuits (October 1, 2020)
  7. Multiplication des poursuites contre les communautés religieuses (August 22, 2020)
  8. ProPublica Releases a List of 6,754 Priests Accused of Sexual Abuse (January 28, 2020)
  9. Le pape François lève le secret pontifical sur les agressions sexuelles (December 17, 2019)
  10. 100s of Accused Priests Living Under Radar With No Oversight (October 4, 2019)
  11. Abus sexuels sur mineurs dans l’Eglise : le pape blâme “Satan” et déçoit les victimes (February 24, 2019)
  12. Pope defrocks ex-cardinal Theodore McCarrick over abuse claims (February 16, 2019)
  13. Pope Acknowledges Nuns Were Sexually Abused by Priests and Bishops (February 5, 2019)
  14. More than 500 priests accused of sexual abuse not yet publicly identified by Catholic Church, Illinois attorney general finds (December 20, 2018)
  15. Prendre la mesure du scandale des prêtres pédophiles au Québec (October 10, 2018)
  16. Abus: le pape exprime sa «honte», Dublin lui demande d’agir (August 25, 2018)
  17. Pennsylvanie: 300 prêtres accusés de pédophilie, plus de 1000 victimes (August 14, 2018)
  18. Cardinal Theodore McCarrick Resigns Amid Sexual Abuse Scandal (July 28, 2018)
  19. Les 34 évêques chiliens offrent leur démission après un scandale de pédophilie (May 18, 2018)
  20. Le cardinal australien Pell sera jugé pour agressions sexuelles (May 1, 2018)
  21. Pope revives lapsed sex abuse commission amid skepticism (February 17, 2018)
  22. Le pape exprime sa “honte” pour des cas de pédophilie dans le clergé chilien (January 16, 2018)
  23. Vatican police ‘break up gay orgy at home of secretary of one of Pope Francis’s key advisers’
    (July 5, 2017)
  24. Pédophilie dans l’Eglise : le poids du silence (2017) présenté par ELISE LUCET (May 18, 2017)
  25. One in 14 Catholic priests accused of abuse in Australia (February 6, 2017)
  26. Des prêtres de Montréal se verront interdire d’être seuls avec des enfants (June 23, 2016)
  27. Le pape crée une instance pour juger les évêques couvrant des abus sexuels (June 10, 2015)
  28. Les propos du pape sur la pédophilie ont des échos jusqu’au Québec (July 15, 2014)
  29. Des victimes de prêtres veulent Mgr Ouellet comme pape (March 11, 2013)
  30. Pornographie juvénile : un prêtre de Sorel-Tracy accusé (March 8, 2013)
  31. Congrégations générales – Les problèmes de l’Église sur la table (March 7, 2013)
  32. Agressions sexuelles: un deuxième frère de Sainte-Croix sera arrêté (December 29, 2012)
  33. Symposium sur la pédophilie – Le pape appelle au «renouveau de l’Église» (February 15, 2012)
  34. Pornographie juvénile – Sitôt condamné, l’ex-évêque Lahey est libéré (January 5, 2012)
  35. Église néerlandaise: des «dizaines de milliers» de mineurs abusés sexuellement (December 16, 2011)
  36. Pédophilie – L’Église veut éduquer son clergé par Internet (June 28, 2011)
  37. Former Catholic bishop Raymond Lahey pleads guilty to child pornography charges (May 4, 2011)
  38. Pédophilie – Le Vatican va envoyer une «circulaire» aux évêques (November 20, 2010)
  39. Undercover Reporter Films Priests At Gay Clubs (July 26, 2010)
  40. Le Vatican durcit les règles contre la pédophilie (July 15, 2010)
  41. Top Catholic Priest Accused of Sexually Abusing His Own Sons (June 25, 2010)
  42. Pope addresses priest abuse scandal (June 11, 2010)
  43. Vatican Sex Abuse Prosecutor: Guilty Priests Are Going To Hell (June 4, 2010)
  44. Priest Accused Of Abusing Boy, Turning Home Into ‘Erotic Dungeon’ Surrenders To Police
    (May 26, 2010)
  45. Le Vatican publiera un guide contre la pédophilie (April 9, 2010)
  46. Agressions sexuelles par des membres du clergé – Les victimes exigent la démission de Mgr Ouellet
    (February 17, 2010)

***

 

La névrose chrétienne (1976) par le Docteur PIERRE SOLIGNAC (May 25, 2012)

BEWARE!

 

VARSOVIE – Dans son plus récent rapport sur les agressions sexuelles commises sur des enfants, l’Église catholique de Pologne reconnaît que 292 membres du clergé auraient abusé de 368 garçons et filles entre 2018 et 2020.

 

Le document dévoilé lundi tombe au moment où le Vatican enquête sur des allégations d’agressions et d’inaction des dirigeants de l’Église en Pologne, un État à prédominance catholique où le clergé jouit d’un statut spécial.

 

Le Saint-Siège a récemment puni certains évêques et archevêques polonais pour leur négligence. Ils ont été bannis des églises et leur ont interdit de présider des cérémonies.

 

Le Vatican enquête également sur des allégations de négligence par l’archevêque de Cracovie aujourd’hui à la retraite, le cardinal Stanislaw Dziwisz, qui a notamment servi à titre de secrétaire personnel du défunt pape Jean-Paul II.

 

Dans une conférence virtuelle, le chef de l’Église catholique de Pologne, l’archevêque Wojciech Polak, a réitéré ses excuses aux victimes et leur a demandé pardon.

 

Monseigneur Adam Zak, chargé d’enquêter sur les abus du clergé contre des enfants et de prévenir ces agressions, a insisté sur le besoin d’agir pour plus de sensibilisation et de prévention en raison du nombre élevé de cas rapportés.

 

Le précédent rapport de l’Église, portant sur les années 1990 à 2018, avait identifié 382 agresseurs soupçonnés d’avoir abusé de 625 victimes mineures. Les noms de 42 agresseurs sont apparus à nouveau dans le plus récent rapport.

 
 

Monika Scislowska
Associated Press

 
 

***

 

(…) À partir de quand peut-on dire que ça (les actions commises par l’Église Catholique) – telle organisation, qui s’est comportée de telle façon, qui a fait tant de victimes … À partir de quand dit-on que c’est une organisation criminelle? – Alain Crevier à l’émission de radio Midi Info de Radio-Canada, édition du 20 décembre 2018 (12 h 21 Des prêtres accusés d’actes pédophiles dans l’Illinois : Le regard d’Alain Crevier)

 

***

 

bishop-accountability.org : Documenting the Abuse Crisis in the Roman Catholic Church

 

***

 

  1. Le Vatican inscrit explicitement la pédocriminalité dans le droit de l’Église (June 1, 2021)
  2. Recours contre le diocèse de Trois-Rivières initié par Dominic Maurais: «Je porte en moi cette blessure»
    (March 26, 2021)
  3. Pédocriminalité en France : 10 000 victimes possibles de l’Église depuis 1950 (March 2, 2021)
  4. Abus sexuels du prêtre Brian Boucher : Un rapport accablant pour l’Église montréalaise (November 25, 2020)
  5. Suburban NY diocese files for bankruptcy amid abuse lawsuits (October 1, 2020)
  6. Multiplication des poursuites contre les communautés religieuses (August 22, 2020)
  7. ProPublica Releases a List of 6,754 Priests Accused of Sexual Abuse (January 28, 2020)
  8. Le pape François lève le secret pontifical sur les agressions sexuelles (December 17, 2019)
  9. 100s of Accused Priests Living Under Radar With No Oversight (October 4, 2019)
  10. Abus sexuels sur mineurs dans l’Eglise : le pape blâme “Satan” et déçoit les victimes (February 24, 2019)
  11. Pope defrocks ex-cardinal Theodore McCarrick over abuse claims (February 16, 2019)
  12. Pope Acknowledges Nuns Were Sexually Abused by Priests and Bishops (February 5, 2019)
  13. More than 500 priests accused of sexual abuse not yet publicly identified by Catholic Church, Illinois attorney general finds (December 20, 2018)
  14. Prendre la mesure du scandale des prêtres pédophiles au Québec (October 10, 2018)
  15. Abus: le pape exprime sa «honte», Dublin lui demande d’agir (August 25, 2018)
  16. Pennsylvanie: 300 prêtres accusés de pédophilie, plus de 1000 victimes (August 14, 2018)
  17. Cardinal Theodore McCarrick Resigns Amid Sexual Abuse Scandal (July 28, 2018)
  18. Les 34 évêques chiliens offrent leur démission après un scandale de pédophilie (May 18, 2018)
  19. Le cardinal australien Pell sera jugé pour agressions sexuelles (May 1, 2018)
  20. Pope revives lapsed sex abuse commission amid skepticism (February 17, 2018)
  21. Le pape exprime sa “honte” pour des cas de pédophilie dans le clergé chilien (January 16, 2018)
  22. Vatican police ‘break up gay orgy at home of secretary of one of Pope Francis’s key advisers’
    (July 5, 2017)
  23. Pédophilie dans l’Eglise : le poids du silence (2017) présenté par ELISE LUCET (May 18, 2017)
  24. One in 14 Catholic priests accused of abuse in Australia (February 6, 2017)
  25. Des prêtres de Montréal se verront interdire d’être seuls avec des enfants (June 23, 2016)
  26. Le pape crée une instance pour juger les évêques couvrant des abus sexuels (June 10, 2015)
  27. Les propos du pape sur la pédophilie ont des échos jusqu’au Québec (July 15, 2014)
  28. Des victimes de prêtres veulent Mgr Ouellet comme pape (March 11, 2013)
  29. Pornographie juvénile : un prêtre de Sorel-Tracy accusé (March 8, 2013)
  30. Congrégations générales – Les problèmes de l’Église sur la table (March 7, 2013)
  31. Agressions sexuelles: un deuxième frère de Sainte-Croix sera arrêté (December 29, 2012)
  32. Symposium sur la pédophilie – Le pape appelle au «renouveau de l’Église» (February 15, 2012)
  33. Pornographie juvénile – Sitôt condamné, l’ex-évêque Lahey est libéré (January 5, 2012)
  34. Église néerlandaise: des «dizaines de milliers» de mineurs abusés sexuellement (December 16, 2011)
  35. Pédophilie – L’Église veut éduquer son clergé par Internet (June 28, 2011)
  36. Former Catholic bishop Raymond Lahey pleads guilty to child pornography charges (May 4, 2011)
  37. Pédophilie – Le Vatican va envoyer une «circulaire» aux évêques (November 20, 2010)
  38. Undercover Reporter Films Priests At Gay Clubs (July 26, 2010)
  39. Le Vatican durcit les règles contre la pédophilie (July 15, 2010)
  40. Top Catholic Priest Accused of Sexually Abusing His Own Sons (June 25, 2010)
  41. Pope addresses priest abuse scandal (June 11, 2010)
  42. Vatican Sex Abuse Prosecutor: Guilty Priests Are Going To Hell (June 4, 2010)
  43. Priest Accused Of Abusing Boy, Turning Home Into ‘Erotic Dungeon’ Surrenders To Police
    (May 26, 2010)
  44. Le Vatican publiera un guide contre la pédophilie (April 9, 2010)
  45. Agressions sexuelles par des membres du clergé – Les victimes exigent la démission de Mgr Ouellet
    (February 17, 2010)

***

 

La névrose chrétienne (1976) par le Docteur PIERRE SOLIGNAC (May 25, 2012)

L'Abbatiale de la
Liturgie Apocryphe

"The production of nervous force is directly connected with the diet of an individual, and its refining depends on the very purity of this diet, allied to appropriate breathing exercises.

The diet most calculated to act effectively on the nervous force is that which contains the least quantity of animal matter; therefore the Pythagorean diet, in this connection, is the most suitable.

...

The main object was to avoid introducing into the organism what Descartes called 'animal spirits'. Thus, all animals that had to serve for the nourishment of the priests were slaughtered according to special rites, they were not murdered, as is the case nowadays".