L'Abbatiale de la
Liturgie Apocryphe

Montréal, p.Q.


 

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Human history contains countless examples of belief systems or spiritual movements rising and falling along with changing cultural forces.

 

It’s easy to think of religious knowledge as fixed since new religions or belief systems rarely just appear overnight, but if you zoom out to a macro level, it’s clear that these areas of knowledge are indeed always undergoing evolution. Would Christians a few decades ago have ever thought that rock and roll, colored lights, and fog machines would ever make their way into church services? Before the internet, would a religion based on blockchain technology have even been a possibility? Belief systems are products and reflections of our cultures, so it’s natural they would evolve alongside of our ever-changing cultures.

 

Occasionally, that means some rather terrifying or eccentic religious or spiritual movements can pop up. Think about what kinds of kookiness the rise of science fiction and flying saucer mythos in the 1950s led to. More recently, the never-ending violence surrounding the Central American drug trade has led to an preoccupation with death for many Central Americans. This has led not only to such cultural movements as Mexico’s la nota roja (“red press”), an industry of bloody true crime tabloids, but also a terrifying-sounding spiritual movement literally worshiping death itself. Or herself.

 

The movement has no official name, but is generally referred to as the cult of Santa Muerte, named after Nuestra Señora de la Santa Muerte, or “Our Lady of Holy Death.” Believers pray to Santa Muerte and leave offerings of flowers, cigarettes, or cocaine at her altars. Some even engage in rituals believed to harness Lady Death’s power in order to exterminate their enemies. It’s no wonder, then, that the cult is quite popular among Mexican and Central American narcos. In fact, it’s become popular among millions of devotees from all walks of life.

 

While there might be a never-ending torrent of violent acts carried out in Saint Death’s name and the media might characterize the movement as some type of narco-cult, some believers feel that the cult of Santa Muerte offers much more than death. Warren Robert Vine, a devotee from Texas, told The Daily Beast that despite the death imagery, there are wholesome ways to worship the Lady of Death:

 

I am embarrassed by the narco abuse of her imagery and power. But I sincerely believe there is a new branch growing within the faith that focuses on people, the family and community.

Perhaps because of this multifaceted nature of the Lady of Holy Death, the cult is quickly gaining popularity. Andrew Chestnut, professor of Religious Studies at Virginia Commonwealth University, says that the cult is growing faster than any other religious movement in the West, maybe even the world:

 

Get this, going back to 2001, Santa Muerte is essentially unknown to 99 percent of Mexicans. Today, a decade and a half later, I estimate that there is some 10 to 12 million devotees in Mexico, the U.S., and Central America.

Could this cult grow into a larger worldwide movement? Will Our Lady of Holy Death become a household name outside of Mexico? Is She the real reason many Americans want that border wall? It’ll take a lot more than a wall to keep Death herself away from your door whether you believe in her or not.

 
 

Brett Tingley
Mysterious Universe
Merci Carolyne Weldon

 
 

***

 

La Santa Muerte (February 23, 2011)

VATICAN CITY — The nun no longer goes to confession regularly, after an Italian priest forced himself on her while she was at her most vulnerable: recounting her sins to him in a university classroom nearly 20 years ago.


At the time, the sister only told her provincial superior and her spiritual director, silenced by the Catholic Church’s culture of secrecy, her vows of obedience and her own fear, repulsion and shame.


“It opened a great wound inside of me,” she told the Associated Press. “I pretended it didn’t happen.”


After decades of silence, the nun is one of a handful worldwide to come forward recently on an issue that the Catholic Church has yet to come to terms with: The sexual abuse of religious sisters by priests and bishops. An AP examination has found that cases have emerged in Europe, Africa, South America and Asia, demonstrating that the problem is global and pervasive, thanks to the universal tradition of sisters’ second-class status in the Catholic Church and their ingrained subservience to the men who run it.


Some nuns are now finding their voices, buoyed by the #MeToo movement and the growing recognition that adults can be victims of sexual abuse when there is an imbalance of power in a relationship. The sisters are going public in part because of years of inaction by church leaders, even after major studies on the problem in Africa were reported to the Vatican in the 1990s.


The issue has flared in the wake of scandals over the sexual abuse of children, and recently of adults, including revelations that one of the most prominent American cardinals, Theodore McCarrick, sexually abused and harassed his seminarians.


The extent of the abuse of nuns is unclear, at least outside the Vatican. Victims are reluctant to report the abuse because of well-founded fears they won’t be believed, experts told the AP. Church leaders are reluctant to acknowledge that some priests and bishops simply ignore their vows of celibacy, knowing that their secrets will be kept.


However, this week, about half a dozen sisters in a small religious congregation in Chile went public on national television with their stories of abuse by priests and other nuns — and how their superiors did nothing to stop it. A nun in India recently filed a formal police complaint accusing a bishop of rape, something that would have been unthinkable even a year ago.


Cases in Africa have come up periodically; in 2013, for example, a well-known priest in Uganda wrote a letter to his superiors that mentioned “priests romantically involved with religious sisters” — for which he was promptly suspended from the church until he apologized in May. And the sister in Europe spoke to the AP to help bring the issue to light.


“I am so sad that it took so long for this to come into the open, because there were reports long ago,” Karlijn Demasure, one of the church’s leading experts on clergy sexual abuse and abuse of power, told the AP in an interview. “I hope that now actions will be taken to take care of the victims and put an end to this kind of abuse.”



TAKING VICTIMS SERIOUSLY


The Vatican declined to comment on what measures, if any, it has taken to assess the scope of the problem globally, what it has done to punish offenders and care for the victims. A Vatican official said it is up to local church leaders to sanction priests who sexually abuse sisters, but that often such crimes go unpunished both in civil and canonical courts.


The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he wasn’t authorized to speak to the issue, said only some cases arrive at the Holy See for investigation. It was a reference to the fact that the Catholic Church has no clear measures in place to investigate and punish bishops who themselves abuse or allow abusers to remain in their ranks — a legal loophole that has recently been highlighted by the McCarrick case.


The official said the church has focused much of its attention recently on protecting children, but that vulnerable adults “deserve the same protection.”


“Consecrated women have to be encouraged to speak up when they are molested,” the official told the AP. “Bishops have to be encouraged to take them seriously, and make sure the priests are punished if guilty.”


But being taken seriously is often the toughest obstacle for sisters who are sexually abused, said Demasure, until recently executive director of the church’s Center for Child Protection at the Pontifical Gregorian University, the church’s leading think tank on the issue.


“They (the priests) can always say ‘she wanted it,’” Demasure said. “It is also difficult to get rid of the opinion that it is always the woman who seduces the man, and not vice versa.”


Demasure said many priests in Africa, for example, struggle with celibacy because of traditional and cultural beliefs in the importance of having children. Novices, who are just entering religious life, are particularly vulnerable because they often need a letter from their parish priest to be accepted into certain religious congregations. “And sometimes they have to pay for that,” she said.


And when these women become pregnant?


“Mainly she has an abortion. Even more than once. And he pays for that. A religious sister has no money. A priest, yes,” she said.


There can also be a price for blowing the whistle on the problem.


In 2013, the Rev. Anthony Musaala in Kampala, Uganda wrote what he called an open letter to members of the local Catholic establishment about “numerous cases” of alleged sex liaisons of priests, including with nuns. He charged that it was “an open secret that many Catholic priests and some bishops, in Uganda and elsewhere, no longer live celibate chastity.”


He was sanctioned, even though Ugandan newspapers regularly report cases of priests caught in sex escapades. The topic is even the subject of a popular novel taught in high schools.


In 2012, a priest sued a bishop in western Uganda who had suspended him and ordered him to stop interacting with at least four nuns. The priest, who denied the allegations, lost the suit, and the sisters later withdrew their own suit against the bishop.


Archbishop John Baptist Odama, leader of the local Ugandan conference of bishops, told the AP that unverified or verified allegations against individual priests should not be used to smear the whole church.


“Individual cases may happen, if they are there,” he said Thursday. “Individual cases must be treated as individual cases.”



PRIESTLY ABUSE OF NUNS IS NOT A NEW PROBLEM


Long before the most recent incidents, confidential reports into the problem focused on Africa and AIDS were prepared in the 1990s by members of religious orders for top church officials. In 1994, the late Sr. Maura O’Donohue wrote the most comprehensive study about a six-year, 23-nation survey, in which she learned of 29 nuns who had been impregnated in a single congregation.


Nuns, she reported, were considered “safe” sexual partners for priests who feared they might be infected with HIV if they went to prostitutes or women in the general population.


Four years later, in a report to top religious superiors and Vatican officials, Sr. Marie McDonald said harassment and rape of African sisters by priests is “allegedly common.” Sometimes, when a nun becomes pregnant, the priest insists on an abortion, the report said.


The problem travelled when the sisters were sent to Rome for studies. They “frequently turn to seminarians and priests for help in writing essays. Sexual favors are sometimes the payment they have to make for such help,” the report said.


The reports were never meant to be made public. The U.S. National Catholic Reporter put them online in 2001, exposing the depths of a scandal the church had long sought to keep under wraps. To date, the Vatican hasn’t said what, if anything, it ever did with the information.


Sister Paola Moggi, a member of the Missionary Combonian Sisters — a religious congregation with a significant presence in 16 African countries — said in her experience the African church “had made great strides” since the 1990s, when she did missionary work in Kenya, but the problem has not been eliminated.


“I have found in Africa sisters who are absolutely emancipated and who say what they think to a priest they meet who might ask to have sex with them,” she told the AP.


“I have also found sisters who said ‘Well, you have to understand their needs, and that while we only have a monthly cycle a man has a continuous cycle of sperm’ — verbatim words from the ’90s,” she said.


But the fact that in just a few weeks scandals of priests allegedly molesting sisters have erupted publicly on two other continents — Asia and Latin America — suggests that the problem is not confined to Africa, and that some women are now willing to break the taboo to denounce it publicly.


In India, a sister of the Missionaries of Jesus filed a police report last month alleging a bishop raped her in May 2014 during a visit to the heavily Christian state of Kerala, and that he subsequently sexually abused her around a dozen more times over the following two years, Indian media have reported. The bishop denied the accusation and said the woman was retaliating against him for having taken disciplinary action against her for her own sexual misdeeds.


In Chile, the scandal of the Sisters of the Good Samaritan, an order dedicated to health care in the diocese of Talca, erupted at the same time the country’s entire Catholic hierarchy has been under fire for decades of sex abuse and cover-ups. The scandal got so bad that in May, Francis summoned all Chilean bishops to Rome, where they all offered to resign en masse.


The case, exposed by the Chilean state broadcaster, involves accusations of priests fondling and kissing nuns, including while naked, and some religious sisters sexually abusing younger ones. The victims said they told their mother superior, but that she did nothing. Talca’s new temporary bishop has vowed to find justice.


The Vatican is well aware that religious sisters have long been particularly vulnerable to abuse. Perhaps the most sensational account was detailed in the 2013 book “The Nuns of Sant’Ambrogio,” based on the archives of the Vatican’s 1860s Inquisition trial of abuse, embezzlement, murder and “false holiness” inside a Roman convent. Once word got out, the Vatican poured the full force of its Inquisition to investigate and punish.


It remains to be seen what the Vatican will do now that more sisters are speaking out.



ONE SISTER’S STORY — AND YEARS OF HURT


The sister who spoke to the AP about her assault in 2000 during confession at a Bologna university clasped her rosary as she recounted the details.


She recalled exactly how she and the priest were seated in two armchairs face-to-face in the university classroom, her eyes cast to the floor. At a certain point, she said, the priest got up from his chair and forced himself on her. Petite but not frail, she was so shocked, she said, that she grabbed him by the shoulders and with all her strength, stood up and pushed him back into his chair.


The nun continued with her confession that day. But the assault — and a subsequent advance by a different priest a year later — eventually led her to stop going to confession with any priest other than her spiritual father, who lives in a different country.


“The place of confession should be a place of salvation, freedom and mercy,” she said. “Because of this experience, confession became a place of sin and abuse of power.”


She recalled at one point a priest in whom she had confided had apologized “on behalf of the church.” But nobody ever took any action against the offender, who was a prominent university professor.


The woman recounted her story to the AP without knowing that at that very moment, a funeral service was being held for the priest who had assaulted her 18 years earlier.


She later said the combination of his death and her decision to speak out lifted a great weight.


“I see it as two freedoms: freedom of the weight for a victim, and freedom of a lie and a violation by the priest,” she said. “I hope this helps other sisters free themselves of this weight.”

 

 

Nicole Winfield and Rodney Muhumuza
Associated Press


***


bishop-accountability.org : Documenting the Abuse Crisis in the Roman Catholic Church


***


La névrose chrétienne (1976) par le Docteur PIERRE SOLIGNAC (May 25, 2012)

ROME — Pope Francis has accepted the resignation of Cardinal Theodore E. McCarrick, the former archbishop of Washington, from the College of Cardinals, ordering him to a “life of prayer and penance” after allegations that the cardinal sexually abused minors and adult seminarians over the course of decades, the Vatican announced on Saturday.

 

Acting swiftly to contain a widening sex abuse scandal at the highest levels of the Roman Catholic Church, the pope officially suspended the cardinal from the exercise of any public ministry after receiving his resignation letter Friday evening. Pope Francis also demanded in a statement that the prelate remain in seclusion “until the accusations made against him are examined in a regular canonical trial.”

 

Cardinal McCarrick appears to be the first cardinal in history to step down from the College of Cardinals because of sexual abuse allegations. While he remains a priest pending the outcome of a Vatican trial, he has been stripped of his highest honor and will no longer be called upon to advise the pope and travel on his behalf.

 

A prominent Roman Catholic voice in international and public policy, Cardinal McCarrick was first removed from public ministry on June 20, after a church panel substantiated allegations that he had sexually abused a teenage altar boy 47 years ago while serving as a priest in New York.

 

Cardinal McCarrick, now 88, said in a statement at the time that he was innocent.

 

Subsequent interviews by The New York Times revealed that some in the church hierarchy had known for decades about accusations that he had preyed on men who wanted to become priests, sexually harassing and touching them. Then a 60-year-old man, identified only as James, alleged that Cardinal McCarrick, a close family friend, had begun to abuse him in 1969, when he was 11 years old, and that the abuse had lasted nearly two decades.

 

The Times investigation detailed settlements amounting to tens of thousands of dollars in 2005 and 2007, paid to men who had complained of abuse by Cardinal McCarrick when he was a bishop in New Jersey in the 1980s, and a rising star in the Roman Catholic Church.

 

On Saturday, the former altar boy whose abuse allegations started the unraveling of the cardinal’s lifetime of honors said in an interview that hearing news of the resignation felt like a “gut punch.”

 

The 62-year-old man, who identified himself only as Mike to protect his privacy, said he believed that Cardinal McCarrick was resigning only because he was being forced to, not because he was accepting responsibility.

 

“I am kind of appalled that it has taken this long for him to get caught,” he said, in the first time he has spoken publicly. “But I am glad I am the first one that could open the door to other people.”

 

Resignations from the College of Cardinals are extremely rare for any reason. The last resignation was of the French prelate Louis Billot in 1927, because of political tensions with the Holy See.

 

Keith Patrick O’Brien, a former archbishop of St. Andrews and Edinburgh, waived his rights as a cardinal in 2013, after accusations emerged of inappropriate sexual behavior with junior clergy. But he remained in the College of Cardinals until his death in March of this year.

 

Cardinal McCarrick’s resignation comes as Pope Francis faces increased pressure to show he is serious about cracking down on bishops and cardinals found to have abused people or covered up abuse.

 

After a Vatican envoy confirmed this year that the Roman Catholic Church in Chile had for decades allowed sexual abuse to go unchecked, the pope apologized, met with victims and accepted the resignation of some bishops — after the country’s clerical hierarchy offered to quit in May. On Monday, prosecutors in Chile said they were investigating 36 cases of sexual abuse against Catholic priests, bishops and lay persons.

 

In April, Cardinal George Pell of Australia, who as the Vatican’s finance chief is one of the Holy See’s highest officials, was ordered to stand trial in an Australian court on several charges of sexual abuse. The next month, Philip Wilson, the archbishop of Adelaide, was convicted of covering up a claim of sexual abuse in the 1970s.

 

Victims and their advocates have long held that bishops have not been held accountable for hiding sexual abuse. With his conviction, Archbishop Wilson became the highest-ranking Catholic official in the world to be convicted of concealing abuse crimes.

 

Last month, Msgr. Carlo Alberto Capella, a former Vatican diplomat in Washington, was found guilty and sentenced to five years in prison by a Vatican tribunal for possessing and distributing child pornography. His sentence was the first in modern history that the Vatican’s own tribunal had handed down in a clerical abuse case. He will now face a canonical trial, which could lead to his removal from the priesthood.

 

As the allegations against Cardinal McCarrick continued to mount in the last month, at least one prominent American cardinal has called for sweeping changes in how the Roman Catholic Church handles sex abuse allegations against bishops and allegations involving adult seminarians, who were not covered in the church’s sex abuse reforms of 2002.

 

“These cases and others require more than apologies,” Cardinal Sean O’Malley, the archbishop of Boston, said in a statement on Wednesday. “They raise up the fact that when charges are brought regarding a bishop or a cardinal, a major gap still exists in the church’s policies on sexual conduct and sexual abuse.”

 

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops has not responded to calls for broader reform since the allegations against Cardinal McCarrick were made public last month. The president of the conference, Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo, released a brief statement Saturday saying that the pope’s acceptance of the resignation “reflects the priority the Holy Father places on the need for protection and care for all our people and the way failures in this area affect the life of the Church in the United States.”

 

Terence McKiernan, president of BishopAccountability.org, which documents the sexual abuse scandal in the church and advocates for victims, called for Pope Francis to make the trial proceedings against Cardinal McCarrick public, and to open an investigation into how Cardinal McCarrick was permitted to advance his church career despite repeated warnings against him.

 

“The officials responsible must be identified and disciplined, and the investigative file must be made public,” Mr. McKiernan said in a statement.

 

Much remains unanswered about Cardinal McCarrick’s alleged abuses, including who in the church hierarchy knew what and when, and whether, as a supervisor, the cardinal handled abuse allegations appropriately in the dioceses he led.

 

“The resignation of one man is not the end, it’s really the beginning,” said Patrick Noaker, the lawyer representing the two men who said the cardinal had abused them as minors. “We now have to go out and find out if others were hurt.”

 
 

Elisabetta Povoledo and Sharon Otterman
The New York Times

 

***

 

bishop-accountability.org : Documenting the Abuse Crisis in the Roman Catholic Church

 

***

 

Les 34 évêques chiliens offrent leur démission après un scandale de pédophilie (May 18, 2018)
Le cardinal australien Pell sera jugé pour agressions sexuelles (May 1, 2018)
Pope revives lapsed sex abuse commission amid skepticism (February 17, 2018)
Le pape exprime sa “honte” pour des cas de pédophilie dans le clergé chilien (January 16, 2018)
Vatican police ‘break up gay orgy at home of secretary of one of Pope Francis’s key advisers’
(July 5, 2017)
Pédophilie dans l’Eglise : le poids du silence (2017) présenté par ELISE LUCET (May 18, 2017)
One in 14 Catholic priests accused of abuse in Australia (February 6, 2017)
Des prêtres de Montréal se verront interdire d’être seuls avec des enfants (June 23, 2016)
Le pape crée une instance pour juger les évêques couvrant des abus sexuels (June 10, 2015)
Les propos du pape sur la pédophilie ont des échos jusqu’au Québec (July 15, 2014)
Des victimes de prêtres veulent Mgr Ouellet comme pape (March 11, 2013)
Pornographie juvénile : un prêtre de Sorel-Tracy accusé (March 8, 2013)
Congrégations générales – Les problèmes de l’Église sur la table (March 7, 2013)
Agressions sexuelles: un deuxième frère de Sainte-Croix sera arrêté (December 29, 2012)
Symposium sur la pédophilie – Le pape appelle au «renouveau de l’Église» (February 15, 2012)
Pornographie juvénile – Sitôt condamné, l’ex-évêque Lahey est libéré (January 5, 2012)
Église néerlandaise: des «dizaines de milliers» de mineurs abusés sexuellement (December 16, 2011)
Pédophilie – L’Église veut éduquer son clergé par Internet (June 28, 2011)
Former Catholic bishop Raymond Lahey pleads guilty to child pornography charges (May 4, 2011)
Pédophilie – Le Vatican va envoyer une «circulaire» aux évêques (November 20, 2010)
Undercover Reporter Films Priests At Gay Clubs (July 26, 2010)
Le Vatican durcit les règles contre la pédophilie (July 15, 2010)
Top Catholic Priest Accused of Sexually Abusing His Own Sons (June 25, 2010)
Pope addresses priest abuse scandal (June 11, 2010)
Vatican Sex Abuse Prosecutor: Guilty Priests Are Going To Hell (June 4, 2010)
Priest Accused Of Abusing Boy, Turning Home Into ‘Erotic Dungeon’ Surrenders To Police
(May 26, 2010)
Le Vatican publiera un guide contre la pédophilie (April 9, 2010)
Agressions sexuelles par des membres du clergé – Les victimes exigent la démission de Mgr Ouellet (February 17, 2010)

 

***

 

La névrose chrétienne (1976) par le Docteur PIERRE SOLIGNAC (May 25, 2012)

 

On 22 June, CheckNews — the fact-checking arm of French newspaper Libération — reported (translation):

 

The scene unfolded during a baptism, which took place on 17 June in a church in Seine-et-Marne, not in Martinique or Belgium, as you might have read on social media in recent days.

 

When contacted by CheckNews, the spokesperson for the diocese said… the priest apologized to the family after the incident, and the baby was indeed baptized.

According to Libération, the diocesan spokesperson described the priest’s actions as “understandable, but not excusable,” and said: “A baptism can be long, and the baby was crying a lot.” In a statement published on 22 June, the diocese of Meaux, located 30 miles east of Paris, confirmed the priest’s suspension (translation):

 

This short video was an extract from a ceremony in which the baby was crying a lot. The elderly priest lost his cool and slapped the child. Mindful of this unwarranted act, the priest apologized to the family after the baptism. The loss of temper can be explained by the elderly priest’s tiredness, but that does not excuse it.

 

On Friday 22 June, Monsignor [Jean Yves] Nahmias, Bishop of Meaux, took precautionary measures whereby the priest is suspended from all marriage and baptism ceremonies.

The diocese has also suspended the priest from his duties at the parish church of Saint-Martin de Champeaux, where he is the rector, the statement added.

 

According to Émilie Geffray, a reporter for the French newspaper Le Figaro, the family of the child has filed a complaint against the priest, but it’s not clear whether that relates to the diocese or if formal criminal charges have been filed.

 
 

Dan MacGuill
Snopes

La conférence épiscopale chilienne a annoncé vendredi que les 34 évêques venus à Rome rencontrer le pape François lui ont offert leur démission, dans la foulée du scandale de pédophilie qui éclabousse l’Église catholique au Chili. On ne sait pas pour le moment si le souverain pontife a accepté ces démissions.


« Nous, tous les évêques présents à Rome, avons remis nos postes entre les mains du Saint-Père afin qu’il décide librement pour chacun d’entre nous », indique une déclaration lue devant la presse, après trois jours de rencontres avec le pape au Vatican.


Nous voulons demander pardon pour la douleur causée aux victimes, au pape, au peuple de Dieu et à notre pays pour les graves erreurs et omissions que nous avons commises.
– Déclaration des évêques chiliens

« Nous remercions les victimes pour leur persévérance et leur courage, malgré les énormes difficultés personnelles, spirituelles, sociales et familiales qu’ils ont dû affronter, auxquelles s’ajoutaient souvent l’incompréhension et les attaques de la communauté ecclésiale », ajoutent-ils.


« Nous implorons leur pardon et leur aide pour continuer à avancer sur le chemin de la guérison des blessures, pour qu’elles puissent se cicatriser », poursuivent les évêques.



Le pape déterminé à rétablir la justice au sein de l’Église


C’est la première fois que toute la conférence des évêques d’un pays présente une démission collective en lien avec ce scandale.


Le pape François avait précédemment reproché aux évêques d’avoir détruit des preuves, incité les avocats de l’Église à minimiser les accusations et fait preuve d’une « négligence grave » quand est venu le temps de protéger les enfants des prêtres pédophiles.


Dans un document accablant de dix pages remis aux évêques plus tôt cette semaine, le souverain pontife affirme que la totalité de la hiérarchie de l’Église chilienne est collectivement responsable de « graves erreurs » dans la gestion des dossiers d’agression et de la perte de crédibilité subséquente de l’Église catholique.


Personne ne peut se disculper et placer le problème sur les épaules des autres.
– Le pape François, dans un document remis aux évêques

Le pape François avait conséquemment annoncé des « changements » à court, moyen et long terme pour rétablir « la justice » au sein de l’Église chilienne.



Des victimes satisfaites


Au début du mois de mai, le pape a accueilli pendant plusieurs jours, dans sa résidence du Vatican, trois hommes qui disent avoir été agressés sexuellement par le père chilien Fernando Karadima. Ce dernier a été reconnu coupable en 2011 par un tribunal du Vatican d’avoir commis des actes pédophiles dans les années 1980 et 1990.


Les trois hommes – Juan Carlos Cruz, James Hamilton et Jose Andrés Murillo – avaient indiqué par après que le pape leur avait promis des mesures « adéquates et durables ». Ils avaient précédemment dénoncé devant la presse l’omerta d’une partie de la haute hiérarchie de l’Église catholique du Chili.


M. Cruz, principal sonneur d’alerte dans cette affaire, a indiqué sur Twitter que ces démissions en bloc constituent un « bon » développement. Selon lui, s’agit d’un événement « sans précédent » qui « changera les choses à jamais ».


« Au nom de la dignité, de la justice et de la vérité, les évêques doivent partir », a aussi tweeté M. Murillo. « Ils n’ont pas su comment protéger les plus faibles, les ont exposés à des abus et ont entravé la justice. Pour ça, ils doivent partir. »


Un voyage du pape François au Chili, en janvier, avait tourné au fiasco après qu’il eut défendu avec force l’évêque chilien Juan Barros, soupçonné d’avoir caché les actes pédophiles du père Karadima. Le prélat était déjà soupçonné d’avoir couvert les crimes présumés du père Karadima lorsqu’il a été nommé évêque par le pape, en 2015.


Juan Barros s’est défendu d’avoir su quoi que ce soit, tandis que le père Karadima a toujours nié les allégations portées contre lui.



Radio-Canada avec Agence France-Presse, Associated Press et Reuters
ici.radio-canada.ca


***


bishop-accountability.org : Documenting the Abuse Crisis in the Roman Catholic Church

***


Le cardinal australien Pell sera jugé pour agressions sexuelles (May 1, 2018)
Pope revives lapsed sex abuse commission amid skepticism (February 17, 2018)
Le pape exprime sa “honte” pour des cas de pédophilie dans le clergé chilien (January 16, 2018)
Vatican police ‘break up gay orgy at home of secretary of one of Pope Francis’s key advisers’
(July 5, 2017)
Pédophilie dans l’Eglise : le poids du silence (2017) présenté par ELISE LUCET (May 18, 2017)
One in 14 Catholic priests accused of abuse in Australia (February 6, 2017)
Des prêtres de Montréal se verront interdire d’être seuls avec des enfants (June 23, 2016)
Le pape crée une instance pour juger les évêques couvrant des abus sexuels (June 10, 2015)
Les propos du pape sur la pédophilie ont des échos jusqu’au Québec (July 15, 2014)
Des victimes de prêtres veulent Mgr Ouellet comme pape (March 11, 2013)
Pornographie juvénile : un prêtre de Sorel-Tracy accusé (March 8, 2013)
Congrégations générales – Les problèmes de l’Église sur la table (March 7, 2013)
Agressions sexuelles: un deuxième frère de Sainte-Croix sera arrêté (December 29, 2012)
Symposium sur la pédophilie – Le pape appelle au «renouveau de l’Église» (February 15, 2012)
Pornographie juvénile – Sitôt condamné, l’ex-évêque Lahey est libéré (January 5, 2012)
Église néerlandaise: des «dizaines de milliers» de mineurs abusés sexuellement (December 16, 2011)
Pédophilie – L’Église veut éduquer son clergé par Internet (June 28, 2011)
Former Catholic bishop Raymond Lahey pleads guilty to child pornography charges (May 4, 2011)
Pédophilie – Le Vatican va envoyer une «circulaire» aux évêques (November 20, 2010)
Undercover Reporter Films Priests At Gay Clubs (July 26, 2010)
Le Vatican durcit les règles contre la pédophilie (July 15, 2010)
Top Catholic Priest Accused of Sexually Abusing His Own Sons (June 25, 2010)
Pope addresses priest abuse scandal (June 11, 2010)
Vatican Sex Abuse Prosecutor: Guilty Priests Are Going To Hell (June 4, 2010)
Priest Accused Of Abusing Boy, Turning Home Into ‘Erotic Dungeon’ Surrenders To Police
(May 26, 2010)
Le Vatican publiera un guide contre la pédophilie (April 9, 2010)
Agressions sexuelles par des membres du clergé – Les victimes exigent la démission de Mgr Ouellet (February 17, 2010)


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La névrose chrétienne (1976) par le Docteur PIERRE SOLIGNAC (May 25, 2012)

L'Abbatiale de la
Liturgie Apocryphe

"The production of nervous force is directly connected with the diet of an individual, and its refining depends on the very purity of this diet, allied to appropriate breathing exercises.

The diet most calculated to act effectively on the nervous force is that which contains the least quantity of animal matter; therefore the Pythagorean diet, in this connection, is the most suitable.

...

The main object was to avoid introducing into the organism what Descartes called 'animal spirits'. Thus, all animals that had to serve for the nourishment of the priests were slaughtered according to special rites, they were not murdered, as is the case nowadays".